Orgasm Myths

Female Orgasm Many people suffer from misconceptions about sex and about female orgasms specifically. Lack of information, sexism and misogyny are behind many of these myths. Female Orgasm.MD sets the record straight below.

They say:

Sex isn't good unless you have an orgasm.

The truth:

Sex is good when both partners enjoy themselves, regardless of who has an orgasm and who doesn't.

They say:

Multiple orgasms are better than just one.

The truth:

The number of orgasms a woman experiences has nothing to do with the quality or intensity of each. More orgasms aren't necessarily better.

They say:

Women can't have orgasms after menopause.

The truth:

Menopause has nothing to do with orgasm. Women can experience orgasms their entire lives.

They say:

Vaginal orgasms are better than clitoral orgasms.

The truth:

Orgasms are good based on your enjoyment of them, not how or where you feel them. Maybe men want to believe that vaginal orgasms are better because that emphasizes the importance of the penis, but it simply isn't true.

They say:

A circumcised penis reduces a woman's ability to achieve orgasm.

The truth:

Circumcision removes a great deal of penile tissue. Some men believe that this reduces the sensitivity of the penis. There has never been any connection established between male circumcision and female orgasm. Some women prefer circumcised men over uncircumcised, and vice versa. This is only a personal preference.

They say:

Condoms can prevent a woman from reaching orgasm.

The truth:

Many men complain of decreased sensitivity during sex when wearing a condom. Generally speaking, though, there's no correlation between condom usage and reduced orgasm in women. If a woman feels that protected sex is less enjoyable, there are a variety of ribbed and studded condoms to enhance the experience for her.

They say:

It takes women longer to reach orgasm than men.

The truth:

With the right stimulation, women can reach orgasm as fast or faster than men.

This myth originates from studies showing that, on average, during intercourse, women reach orgasm 3 minutes more slowly than men. But foreplay and clitoral stimulation during intercourse can help women achieve orgasm much faster.

They say:

There's no such thing as a G spot.

The truth:

False. Every woman who has paraurethral glands has a G spot, though some women do not find G spot stimulation particularly pleasurable or desirable. Other women do. Read G Spot Basics for more information.

They say:

Female ejaculation is just women peeing.

The truth:

Female ejaculatory fluid is chemically similar to male ejacula. Female ejaculatory fluid is produced in the paraurethral glands and ejected from the urethra (just like a man's ejaculation). Some women allegedly ejaculating during pornographic films are possibly urinating, but female ejaculation is a real and natural phenomenon.

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